Parable of the Sower and Parable of the Talents by Octavia Butler

October 19, 2016 Dystopian, Post-Apocalyptic Fiction 12

Greetings Bookworms!

I’ve been on an Octavia Butler kick lately. After I read Fledgling (review) wherein Octavia Butler turned vampire lore upside down, I decided it was time to tackle dystopian/post apocalyptic Butler. When an author totally blows your mind in multiple genres (because Kindred too!), it only makes sense to explore their entire backlist of titles, right? Enter Parable of the Sower and Parable of the Talents.

parable-of-the-sowerParable of the Sower opens with a world rocked by environmental and economic crises. The US has devolved into complete social chaos wherein even gated communities cannot be guaranteed of their safety. Food prices have skyrocketed, crime runs rampant, and emergency services are available only to those who can afford to pay the fees. Lauren Olamina lives in Southern California with her family when their relatively safe existence behind walls goes down in flames. Literally. In an attempt to survive in the aftermath, she flees northward, hoping to find a safe haven in which to explore and establish her newfound faith. Parable of the Talents continues Lauren’s story as she tries to establish a community and eek out an existence in what is left of society. Her efforts at rebuilding some semblance of life are hard won, but making headway. Unfortunately, shparable-of-the-talentse must contend with slavery, human trafficking, religious fundamentalists, and nightmarish political leaders. Suffice it to say that things don’t go particularly smoothly.

I won’t sugar coat it- these books scared the ever-loving crap o
ut of me. I hadn’t had a book related nightmare in ages (and I read Joe Hill this summer!) but these novels were chilling. CHILLING. There were so many terrifying and startling parallels to current political cycle, I can’t even. DOWN TO THE CAMPAIGN SLOGAN, YOU GUYS. I can only hope Butler is simply an insightful genius and not an actual oracle, because I am fifty shades of
freaked out. I’m not saying that a certain candidate’s presidency would bring about an apocalyptic hellscape, but, I HAVE CONCERNS.

Despite the nightmares, these books were phenomenal, insightful, and generally awesome. I would recommend that all of humanity (and probably a few extra terrestrial species) read these books. I apologize in advance for your bad dreams, bookworms, but these books are SO GOOD.

What is the last book that gave YOU bad dreams? 

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12 Responses to “Parable of the Sower and Parable of the Talents by Octavia Butler”

  1. encgolsen

    I love Octavia Butler! She is one of my all time favorites. Your review made me want to go back and read her books all over again. As for nightmares, though, I’ll have to go with The Passage by Justin Cronin. That one got into my head.

  2. Megan M.

    I can’t handle dystopians right now. They all sound too real. Is it November 8th yet?

    • wordsfor

      Definitely wait on it. Whew. I’m so glad you dug Fledgling though! I thought that book was crazy good I’m glad I talked you into it :).

  3. Jenny @ Reading the End

    Ooh, what WAS the last book to give me bad dreams? I can’t remember, but I will say that I faaaaaaaaaaaairly regularly have bad Harry Potter dreams. Like I’d say at least once every two months I have a dream featuring Voldemort. They’re not always scary, but Voldemort has definitely become a stand-in in my subconscious for like, menacing invisible evil.

    • wordsfor

      Hahahahaha- I’ve had HP dreams many a time. Usually they involve Quidditch for some reason. Which makes no sense. Because I don’t care for sports IRL and broomsticks look exceedingly uncomfortable.

  4. DoingDewey

    I’ve not read anything by Octavia Butler, but I feel as though I’m hearing her recommended a lot lately! She sounds like an author whose books I really should make time for 🙂

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