Tag: cyborgs

Jun 27

Domo Arigato, Mr. Roboto: An Idiosyncratic Lit List

Idiosyncratic Lit List 12

Konnichiwa Bookworms,

The other day Hubs and I were driving somewhere when everyone’s favorite Styx song came on the radio. I share this because it’s important, and I don’t want to be the only one with the song stuck in my head. Behold:

Now that we all have robots on the brain, let’s talk about some of the coolest artificial intelligence in literature, shall we?

robotbooks

1. Cinder by Marissa Meyer: Everybody’s favorite cyborg Cinderella story! It’s pretty awesome that catastrophic injuries can be overcome with scientific enhancements, but there are downsides to being a cyborg. You’re treated a lot more like a computer than a person, which suuuucks. Luckily, it’s a fairy tale, and good things can still happen to underdog cyborgs. (review)

2. The Mad Scientist’s Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke: Sometimes young girls are mentored by androids they accidentally fall in love with. Stranger things have happened, right? To be fair, Finn isn’t just any android. He’s one of a kind and he’s got feelings. Interesting to think about just what makes a human human. (review)

3. Solomon the Peacemaker by Hunter Welles: The world’s problems can be solved… As long as a human is attached by the brain to a super computer. Peace comes at a pretty high cost if you’re the one who’s drawn to be attached to the machine. (review)

Got any more sweet robot stories for me, Bookworms? Sound off!

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a commission. I’m saving up to buy myself a robot maid. By the time I have the money saved up, they might exist. You don’t know!*

 

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Jan 09

Solomon The Peacemaker by Hunter Welles

Dystopian, Science 15

Hiya Bookworms,

A few weeks back I ran across a review for a book that piqued my interest. Monika from A Lovely Bookshelf on the Wall posted a review of a very cool sounding dystopian book called Solomon the Peacemaker by Hunter Welles. I love a good dystopia, so I made my way over to NetGalley to ask nicely for an advanced copy. *Full Disclosure: I received a copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I wouldn’t dream of lying, for I fear the wrath of the robots…*

solomon the peacemakerThis book is set in the future- the world has been cordoned off into safe zones known as “nodes” for major cities as well as outlying areas of wildness. Robots known as “servods” perform household functions for the majority of families living within nodes. Sadly, none of them have the comedic timing of Rosie from The Jetsons. The peace of society as it is now known rests heavily in the hands of “the Peacemaker.” The Peacemaker is an elaborate computer program designed to predict and diffuse violent conflicts around the world. It also needs to be installed in a human’s head in order to work. Because cyborgs.

We slowly learn these facts through what appear to be psychological or criminal investigative interviews with Vincent Chell. Vincent and his wife Yael were never big fans of the whole robot industry, feelings which led to their involvement with a bizarre cult-like resistance group determined to undermine the Peacemaker. I found this narrative technique intriguing, as Chell’s memories slowly unfolded.

I was riveted by the story, but rather disappointed in the ending. I won’t be a Spoiler-Saurus-Rex, but I was left with some lingering questions… If you have any inclination toward sci/fi and dystopian fiction, I’d recommend you give Solomon the Peacemaker a try.

If you could have a robotic housekeeper, would you? I’d be all over that, because cooking is the worst. I’d get a chef robot. Dangit science, when is somebody going to get me a chef robot?!

*If you choose to make a purchase of Solomon the Peacemaker from a link on this site, I will receive a small commission… Which I intend to invest in the research and development of chef robots.*

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