Category: Memoirs

Dec 06

An Evening with David Sedaris: Theft by Finding

Author Events, Humor, Memoirs 1

Well Hello, Bookworms!

I thought I’d catch you up on what I’ve been doing, or more accurately, what I was doing in late April. I’ve always had a soft spot for David Sedaris and his quirky essays (here’s a review from a while back.) Of course, his humor and tone aren’t for everyone (as evidenced by the friend to whom I loaned Me Talk Pretty One Day who was UNIMPRESSED by the casual drug usage.) Not every writer is for every reader, but if you are a Sedaris fan, you were probably pretty stoked to hear that he was released a new book of his diary entries called Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977-2002). *I received a complimentary copy of this book through NetGalley and have been hideously tardy in supplying a review for which I apologize. I haven’t accepted any more galleys in recent days given my sporadic (at best) blogging presence.*

Luckily, I found a kindred spirit in my neighbor/book club member/friend Catherine (remember when we threw her a bookish baby shower?) She is the sweetest, and shares my penchant for both David Sedaris and NPR. Which is why when she found out Sedaris was coming to our little corner of Illinois for a speaking engagement and to promote Theft by Finding, she texted me right away and plans were made.

Yes, we paid $40 for 2nd balcony tickets and we’d do it again!

I insisted on getting tickets in the balcony because the main floor seats in this theater have no center aisle and crawling over people whilst I was 25 or so weeks pregnant sounded AWFUL. Of course, the best laid plans were all for naught, because we still ended up having people crawl over us, but I digress. The fact that I was hauling around a sizable belly and already had swollen ankles (nope, no complications, I just retain water like WOAH) also meant that we opted out of waiting in line for the book signing. Plus, I’m totally intimidated by authors I admire and figured I’d say or do something awkward enough to land me in a future Sedaris anecdote.

The reading was mostly segments of Theft by Finding and if you’re a fan of Sedaris’s work, it’s a treat. All the weirdness you love about his essays are presented in real life snippets of diaries he’s kept for his entire adult life. The sardonic slice of life observations will delight his fans, and hearing them in his own voice is even better. If you’ve not yet indulged in Sedaris’s self-narrated audio books, I HIGHLY recommend you do so.

The long and short of it is, if you dig Sedaris, you’ll like Theft by FindingGo out and grab yourself a copy, bonus points for the audio book. And, should you discover Sedaris is coming to your town, you won’t be disappointed by attending one of his events (if it’s in your budget.) May you be braver than I and get your book signed. He’s rather creative with his inscriptions, I’m having some regrets that I didn’t wait in that line. Of course, now that I have ankles again, it’s easy to forget how swollen I was. 7 months ago Katie has ZERO regrets.

Any of you bookworms have a signed Sedaris book? Any weird doodles or inscriptions?

*If you make a purchase from a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

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Apr 19

Bleaker House by Nell Stevens

Memoirs 9

Greetings Bookworms!

When I’m confronted with a book that has a penguin on the cover, it’s almost a given that I will read it. Enter Bleaker House: Chasing My Novel to the End of the World by Nell Stevens. My friend and book-enabler Heather (aka Capricious Reader) sent me a link to this book and I wasted zero time in going to NetGalley to procure a copy. That’s right. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher for review consideration. As always, my integrity is worth more than the price of a digital review copy, so you can trust me to be honest. You can start worrying when people start handing me fistfuls of cash along with my free books. Which will happen exactly never. So. There you go.*

In this book, the author runs away to Falklands (on a school supported fellowship) in order to deprive herself of distractions so she can write her novel. She ends up finding that you can’t force the writing of a novel, even in utter isolation. Also she was bad about packing her food which made me as a reader anxious and hungry. Because her calorie count. So bleak. That was the bleakest bit, really, the lack of food. I wish I could blame this on the fact that I read this while pregnant, but no. I don’t like being hungry under any circumstances. There was a lot of useful self discovery and a bit of indulgent navel gazing (but really, who wouldn’t do that when isolated in such a manner?) I just wish there hadn’t been a penguin on the cover. While the author did see penguins on her frequent walks, they didn’t play a particularly integral role in the story. I mean, the author couldn’t have anticipated the level of penguin enthusiast who would be attracted to her book, but I was a bit disappointed when the penguin related capers and friendships I imagined never materialized.

Bottom line? If you’re interested in one writer’s process, definitely check out Bleaker House: Chasing My Novel to the End of the World. If you are more interested in penguin capers, email me and I’ll supply you with a reading list to suit your fancy.

Bookworms, I must know. Have any of you been hoodwinked by the cover art on a book?

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

 

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Sep 08

Pancakes in Paris by Craig Carlson

Memoirs 5

Bonjour, Bookworms!

When I was at BEA back in May, I was pitched a book that sounded ridiculously charming. It was called Pancakes in Paris: Living the American Dream in France and it was the memoir of a dude named Craig Carlson who started an American style diner in Paris. Because e’rybody needs bacon. I wasn’t able to get a copy of the book at the convention, but I was able to get it digitally through NetGalley after the fact, which actually worked out better for me. Kindle = convenience = reading in bed. So. Full disclosure. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher for review consideration. They didn’t even offer me pancakes to sweeten the deal, so you know all opinions expressed will be honest. I make no such promises if bacon is offered along with books.*

pancakes in parisYou know that thing where despite a total lack of experience in an industry, you decide to dive in, head first? In an international market? With no idea what you’re doing? Craig Carlson does! He was the product of humble beginnings in working class Connecticut and went on to acquire the American dream: a college education and a boatload of debt. A study abroad program had caused Carlson to fall in love with Paris and all things French, and during a transitional period in his career, he realized the one thing he’d REALLY missed in his adopted homeland was… Pancakes. More specifically, an American style diner experience. So he decided to start a diner. In Paris. With no money and no clue. The book chronicles Carlson’s struggles from idea inception to completion, with all the road bumps in between. Here are some things that I learned from this book:

ONE: French people refer to American style coffee as “sock water” and think it’s totally lame.

TWO: It is really, really difficult to get fired from your job in France. Which is great, I guess, if you’re an employee. Terrible if you’re a business owner and you happen to have hired poorly.

THREE: All those awesome old European buildings I find so romantic probably also have highly unromantic plumbing problems. Old pipes are just no fun, y’all.

If you’re into fun memoirs, culture clashes, or breakfast food, check out Pancakes in ParisThere’s a chance you’ll really want to run out to your local diner afterward though. Fair warning. 

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

 

 

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Mar 17

Locally Laid by Lucie B Amundsen Review and Giveaway

Giveaways, Memoirs 8

Greetings Bookworms!

The Easter season is upon us, and regardless of whether or not you celebrate, eggs and bunnies have a way of infiltrating all the things. Also, Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups actually taste better when they’re shaped like eggs. I’d argue it’s been empirically proven, but I simply don’t have the data to back that up. Seriously though, is there a better time of year to talk about eggs? It’s just the happiest of coincidences that today I get to tell you all about Lucie B Amundsen’s memoir about her family’s adventures in starting a pasture-raised egg farm. *I received a complimentary copy of Locally Laid: How We Built a Plucky, Industry-changing Egg Farm – from Scratch from the publisher for review consideration. It didn’t take long for me to accept after reading the title. I love a good double entendre.*

locallylaidOne evening over dinner in a Mexican restaurant, Lucie Amundsen’s husband Jason casually drops the bomb that he’d like to leave Corporate America behind and become an egg farmer. A locally sourced, pasture raised, foray into agriculture. Her reaction is essentially what mine would be: shock, hysterical crying, and the desperate hope that she was being punked.

As it turns out, Locally Laid was no joke. Hilariously cheeky brand name aside, the process of acquiring a few thousand laying hens was no easy feat. And since the hens they did acquire had been raised in an industrial manner, Jason and Lucie not only had to learn how to farm, but also learn how to teach chickens act like chickens. With antique machinery and a heck of a lot of gumption, they set off on the adventure of a lifetime. There’s a steep learning curve when it comes to farming as you may well imagine, but chicken farming in Duluth, Minnesota? WINTER IS COMING. The story is funny, smart, informative, devastating, and heartwarming. Plus it’s got a whole lot of chickens named LoLa.

I learned so much about agriculture in the US as a result of reading this book, which, frankly, is not a not a thing I’d have expected to find interesting. (I also learned a lot about chicken butts which is a thing I WOULD HAVE expected to find interesting. I’m just mentioning it because chicken butts.) I’m not a foodie, okay? I don’t get excited about artisanal cheeses or organic kale. I’m sure they’re awesome, but I was under the impression that local food was the exclusive domain of the foodie class. One of the things I loved so much about Amundsen’s book (aside from her killer sense of humor, because I would not turn down a beer with this lady) was that she made the whole concept of locally produced food seem accessible. She did a really great job of advocating for small and middle ag without making me feel like a complete jerk for my earlier willful ignorance. Does this mean I’m going to start getting up early and frequenting farmer’s markets? Probably not. BUT I plan to pay a little more attention in the grocery store. And maybe try my hand at a vegetable garden this spring. That’s a pretty awesome result for a plucky little book about chickens, no?

You want to read this now, don’t you? Today is your lucky day because the folks at Avery have provided a giveaway copy of Locally Laid for you! (And by “the folks at Avery” I mean Farin. Thanks for hooking us up, girl!)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site I may receive a commission. It depends on the link. But full disclosure and all that.*

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Mar 04

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot by Kim Barker

Memoirs, Non Fiction 9

Howdy Howdy Bookworms!

You know what’s super inconvenient? Books with the same title as other books. Take for example, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot. About a year ago I read a book by this title which was written by David Shafer. It was pretty weird (and not my favorite, to be honest, here’s the review.) Of course, it was quirky and partially set in the Middle East with at least one female protagonist, so when I saw that Tina Fey had a movie coming out called Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, I assumed it was based on Shafer’s book. I literally looked at my husband when I saw the first preview and was like “Uh… They seem to have taken a lot of liberties…” Turns out, I was wrong. Well, probably not about the liberties, because you know how Hollywood is, but it’s definitely not based on the aforementioned novel. I know this because I was recently contacted by the publisher of the book the movie is ACTUALLY based on. It is also called Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, BUT it was originally published as The Taliban Shuffle: Strange Days in Afghanistan and Pakistan. It’s by Kim Barker, a foreign correspondent who worked in Afghanistan and Pakistan during the early 2000s. Are you confused yet? I sort of am. Whew. *As I mentioned already, I received a complimentary copy of this book for review consideration. I’m not good at lying, so you don’t need to worry about compromised integrity. I’m like… the Pinocchio of book reviews. I try to lie and everyone can tell. It’s just not worth the effort.*


whiskeytangofoxtrotWhiskey Tango Foxtrot
AKA The Taliban Shuffle: Strange Days in Afghanistan and Pakistan is Kim Barker’s memoir based on her years working as a foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune. It’s a delicious “pay no attention to the man behind the curtain” sort of book. It contains the things you might expect from a war correspondent’s memoir. I mean, there’s plenty of sadness and danger and tragedy, but Kim Barker’s also got a dark sense of humor about her, which is just the sort of thing I admire in a writer. Barker shares not just the news she covered, but the news behind the news. All the dishy side notes about the foreign journalists’ frat house shenanigans. The relationships gone awry. The adrenaline junkie colleagues. That one time a warlord taught her to wield a Kalishnikov…

If you have any interest in a first hand account of the political machinations of Afghanistan and Pakistan during this time period, you will love this book. If you are interested in the secret life of journalists, you will love this book. If you enjoy explorations of culture clashes, you will love this book.

I must admit that though I do try to stay informed, I hadn’t heard of Kim Barker prior to reading this book. I’m not much of a newspaper reader, which is not a fact I’m particularly proud of, but there it is. Like I said. Pinocchio. I do, however, listen to a lot of NPR. Which is why, upon reading the author’s notes I had a “SANTA?! I KNOW HIM!” moment when Kim Barker thanked Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson for talking her into taking an early morning shot of whiskey. I’m sure there’s a really excellent story there, probably involving extreme awesomeness and nerves of steel. Could these journalists BE any more badass? I think not.

Tell me something, Bookworms! Have you ever gotten your signals crossed with books and movies having the same (or strikingly similar) titles?

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

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Nov 23

The Penguin Lessons by Tom Michell

Memoirs, Non Fiction 6

Greetings Bookworms!

You know how they say you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover? Since I do a lot of my reading digitally, I’m not usually prone to that, but I am guilty of judging a book by it’s title. I was browsing NetGalley not too long ago and I ran across a title called The Penguin Lessons: What I Learned from a Remarkable Bird. I didn’t request this solely based on the title. The cover art and the blurb indicating a real life penguin was involved also influenced my decision. I make no apologies for my penguin enthusiasm. Not a single one. PENGUINS FOREVER! *I received a complimentary copy of this book for review consideration. My good opinion cannot be bought with a free book. It can be bought with charming penguins, however.*

thepenguinlessons

Tom Michell was a 23 year old Brit with wanderlust when he decided to accept a post teaching in Argentina in the 1970s. While on holidays from school teaching, he often went exploring other South American locales. While visiting a beach in Uruguay, he happened upon a heartbreaking scene. An oil slick had caused hundreds of penguins to wash ashore. (I had such a hard time reading this part, it was worse than those ASPCA commercials where the dogs with injuries look at you so pathetically while Sarah McLachlan sings.) Among the sea of perished penguins (SOB), there was but a single sign of life. Acting on a crazy impulse, Michell decided to take the surviving penguin home, wash him off, and release him back into the wild. It was the 70s, you guys. There weren’t hotlines for wildlife rescue and whatnot. After an eventful de-oiling, the penguin, now known as Juan Salvador, refuses to leave Tom’s side. Naturally Tom does the only logical thing- he smuggles Juan Salvador across the border and takes him home.

A pet penguin!!! You guys, this is the DREAM. Juan Salvador is a Magellanic penguin, which resonated with me especially as the penguin I met face-t0-face was a  Magellanic penguin too! Juan Salvador was beyond charming. He became the school’s de-facto rugby mascot, party host, and swimming coach. It’s worth noting that Michell DOES mention all the weirdness that comes with keeping a penguin as a pet, particularly the fact that they poop wherever the heck they want to and need a rather large supply of fresh fish. Still, Juan Salvador seems to thrive in his new home and it’s the cutest thing ever. EVER. This book is not for those who are interested in flowery prose as Michell is quite plain spoken, but who needs flowery prose when you had a penguin pet?! This book is definitely worth a read, even if you’re not an insane penguin lover.

katiepeng2

I met a penguin, and it’s one of the highlights of my life. Not even kidding.

It’s worth noting that at the end of the novel, Michell, who thinks he’s lost all his photographs from that period of his life, runs across some old video footage of Juan Salvador. I tried to locate this clip online, and when I couldn’t find it, I contacted the publisher because I just couldn’t NOT see it. They were kind enough to oblige me with a clip that I’ve loaded below for your viewing pleasure. It’s the best. Many thanks to George Foster at Penguin Random House for supplying me with the footage, and many thanks to Tom Michell for being my penguin rescue hero! Obviously, I think everyone should go procure a copy of The Penguin LessonsFor the love of penguins!

Talk to me Bookworms! Don’t you wish your high school had a live penguin mascot that you could swim with?! Gaaaah I’m dying. DYING, you guys!

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

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Nov 11

My Neighbors Are Better Than Your Neighbors: Even When The Book Isn’t…

Book Club, Memoirs 6

Hello Bookworms,

Last week we had our monthly meeting of my neighborhood’s book club. We don’t have an official name, but I’ve dubbed us “My Neighbors Are Better Than Your Neighbors” because it’s true. I don’t usually write up full reviews for our selections, though that’s usually because I’ve already read and reviewed them on the blog. I told them a long time ago not to worry about choosing books I hadn’t read because I’m a book glutton and everyone should get to read what they want to read, you know? Plus, I have an unfair advantage with blogging and ARCs, so I’m kind of the worst. Anyway, this month was Jennifer’s turn to host and she picked a book I hadn’t read yet. Exciting!

Rose

Rose: My Life in Service to Lady Astor is a memoir by Rosina Harrison. She served for 35 years as a lady’s maid to Lady Nancy Astor, a temperamental world traveling Parliamentarian who often entertained royalty. Going into this book, I didn’t realize just how journal-like it was going to be. Don’t get me wrong, it was pretty darn fascinating to read how the other half lived. I mean, changing clothes 5 times a day? Fancy hats? Butlers and footmen and scullery maids and jewelry so valuable you needed a security detail? I’ve not seen Downton Abbey, but I imagine fans of the show would enjoy this book… Except… There really was no scandal, no hijinks. No below stairs drama or major impropriety on the part of the family. It was all pretty well on the up and up. Which again, is lovely… But rather dull. I did take issue with a couple of things in this novel. First, there is a discussion of the Astor family’s fortune and Harrison decided it wasn’t even interesting enough to footnote the fact that JJ Astor perished aboard the Titanic (which believe you me, is super noteworthy. Especially if when you consider that Victor from The Young and the Restless played him in the blockbuster movie version of the tragedy.) Secondly, there were a lot of typos in there for a book that was professionally published. I’m not usually a stickler for these things, which means that if the average book has a few mistakes that I never even notice, this book had a lot more than a few. They even spelled “Astor” wrong once, like “aster” the flower, and that was just weird. So. Yeah. Not the best book ever. Of course, Jennifer then made some really fancy treats which totally made up for the lackluster book. How pretty are these?!

Apples, puff pastry, jam, and prettiness.

Apples, puff pastry, jam, and prettiness.

Talk to me Bookworms! Do you watch Downton Abbey? Am I missing everything?

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

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Jun 25

I Don’t Know Where You Know Me From by Judy Greer

Audio Books, Humor, Memoirs 10

Hola Bookworms!

After the roaring win that was Aisha Tyler’s memoir Self-Inflicted Wounds (because audio books read by the author are the best), I thought I’d visit the memoir of Tyler’s Archerco-star (and co-star to, well, everyone) Judy Greer. You know the adorable best friend in every successful rom-com ever? That’s Judy Greer! She wrote a book called I Don’t Know What You Know Me From in which she discusses all sorts of things from her adoration of feta (she is my people) to awkward fan encounters. I’ll tell you this much, Judy, if I ever run into you, I’ll know EXACTLY where I know you from. My imaginary slumber party, obvi.

judygreerPro tip: if you’re an actress, you should DEFINITELY read your own memoir and record it so I can listen. Interviewers never ask interesting enough questions, letting Hollywood types speak for themselves ends in either delightful anecdotes or train wrecks, either of which are highly entertaining. Judy falls into the delightful anecdote camp, as I had no doubt she would.

Judy Greer is a Midwestern gal who sort of fell into acting. Since she didn’t grow up practicing her Oscar acceptance speech, she’s remarkably down-to-earth regardless of the number of A-list celebs she’s peed next to. She’s addicted to drug store cosmetics and secretly removes her Spanx in the restroom as soon as she’s finished on the red carpet. She is of the opinion that working in food service is a character building experience (with which I wholeheartedly concur) and she still has normal non-Hollywood friends. Like me.

Reasons Judy Greer should be my friend:

1. We are both Midwestern and love feta.

2. We each have a parent who originally trained to join the Catholic clergy.

3. We’ve both taken preemptive Benadryl in order to snuggle with cats. Sometimes you need to snuggle something and a dog/husband/baby isn’t available, okay?!

If you are a fan of chick flicks, you’ll certainly recognize Judy Greer and should therefore read and/or listen to I Don’t Know What You Know Me From. If you make it through without wanting to be Judy’s pal, I’ll buy you a cookie.** On that note, Bookworms, what’s your favorite romantic comedy?!

*If you find Archer amusing, you need to check out Frisky Dingo. You can thank me later. Actually, thank Hubs. This is all his fault.

**I will not actually buy you a cookie. I’m a jerk with limited funds.

***Speaking of funds, though, if you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.***

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Jun 15

Self Inflicted Wounds and Why Aisha Tyler is My New BFF

Audio Books, Humor, Memoirs 21

Greetings Bookworms,

I love a good celebrity memoir. It can be a tricky business, though. Sometimes you’ll pick up a celebrity memoir and the celeb will be unfunny, self important, and/or preachy. All that is GREAT if you’re hate-reading, but it can be a huge disappointment when it’s a celebrity you think is awesome. Kind of bursts the bubble, you know? Luckily, the opposite can happen. For example. Aisha Tyler. I know who she is and I’ve enjoyed her work, but I’ve never been ready to join her fan club or anything. At least, not until I listened to her narration of her book Self-Inflicted Wounds: Heartwarming Tales of Epic Humiliation. Now I want her to attend all my imaginary slumber parties! (That is a phrase that probably shouldn’t be uttered by a 32 year old woman, but whatever. This is the internet. I don’t even register on the creepy scale here.)

selfinflictedwoundsIn case you needed more evidence to show that the world is an unfair place, Aisha Tyler is not only statuesque and beautiful, she’s also smart, witty, and charming. Luckily, she’s also a GINORMOUS NERD, so she is my people. I don’t trust anybody who didn’t go through an awkward phase growing up. I mean, how can you develop as a person if you don’t have weird hair or terrible fashion sense or at least one horrifying experience with a maxi pad?!

Aisha Tyler spent tons of time reading books, being awkward, and embarrassing herself. It takes a special kind of person to puke on their crush and live to tell about it. You know the recurring nightmare you have about missing a test? Aisha Tyler slept through her SATs! And she still got into an ivy league school! (The unconscious SAT was her second go at it, but still damn impressive.) Aisha Tyler’s misadventures are tremendously entertaining, but she owns her part in all of them. I find it endlessly frustrating when people act like they’ve played no part in their own misfortune. (I’m not saying I’m not guilty of this sort of thing myself on occasion, but we’re not talking about me here.) Aisha Tyler is all “Yep, I made some really stupid choices. That was a terrible idea. You probably shouldn’t stay out all night getting wasted when your SATs are in the morning. Don’t steal your mom’s favorite shirt and try to deep fry things because you’ll start a fire. Ballerina outfits should only be worn by ballerinas.”

Should you read this book? Well. If you like things that do not suck, I would say, “yes, read this book.” I laughed, I cringed, and in the end, I wanted Aisha Tyler to be my BFF. Do yourself a favor and pick up a copy of Self-Inflicted Wounds: Heartwarming Tales of Epic Humiliationokay?

Talk to me, Bookworms! Has a celebrity memoir ever changed your opinion of said celebrity? Was it in a good way or a bad way? 

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

 

 

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Mar 02

Amy Poehler Wrote a Book? Yes, Please!

Audio Books, Humor, Memoirs 12

Bookworms, My Darlings,

We need to talk about Amy Poehler. I know I talk about audio books all the time and I know that a lot of you are hesitant to give them a whirl. If you haven’t taken the plunge yet, I implore you to start with Amy Poehler’s Yes Please.

yespleaseWhen it comes to memoirs, I often feel that I can “hear” the author’s voice in the printed page, and that goes double if I actually know the author’s voice from TV or whatever. ACTUALLY listening to the author read the book is a super fantastic bonus. (Honestly, I feel like I missed the boat by not listening to Mindy Kaling and Tina Fey’s books, but that’s a story for another day, and another couple of Audible credits.) But extra, extra fun? Guest voices. Listening to Amy’s parents read was the cutest friggin thing that has ever happened in the history of ever. Hearing her banter with Seth Meyers? A delicious SNL flashback. Kathleen Turner popping in to narrate salacious bits? Priceless.

This book reminded me of Tiny Beautiful Things (review) only HILARIOUS. Amy (yes, we’re on a first name basis. She’s my FRIEND, damnit!) serves up funny childhood stories, behind the scenes famous person stuff, and a heaping helping of heart. Her take on the Mommy Wars is basically perfect. “Good for you, not for me,” should be everyone’s mantra. Amy managed to discuss a wide range of topics (including her divorce!) without ever coming across as angry or bitter. She acknowledges mistakes she’s made and her less-than-proud moments. (Not her most embarrassing moments, though. She doesn’t have to tell you about those, and you don’t have to tell anyone about yours either! Amy said so!) I didn’t think it was possible for me to love Amy Poehler more than I already did, but she is made of magic and sunshine, so OF COURSE my admiration increased. Read this book, you guys. For reals.

Tell me Bookworms, do any of you have a celebrity you like to pretend is your friend in real life? I can’t be the only one, right?

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

 

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