May 05

Magruder’s Curiosity Cabinet by HP Wood

Historical Fiction, Plague 0

Greetings Bookworms!

I’m about to tell you a story about what happens when one doesn’t read titles carefully. I was browsing NetGalley one day looking for something to read (it’s a rare occasion that I go hunting for books in this manner, as they usually find me, but I was in a reading lull.) Anywho. I ran across a book called Magruder’s Curiosity Cabinet by HP Wood. However, seeing as I had Harry Potter on the brain at the time, I read “Magruder’s” as “Marauder’s.” It sounded a bit circus-y, so I was down for it, even once I realized I’d misread the title.

magrudersMagruder’s Curiosity Cabinet is set in 1904 Coney Island. Kitty Hayward is a British girl visiting the attractions in Coney Island with her mother when her mother comes down with a mysterious illness. The hotel staff send her off on a fool’s errand for some medicine, and upon her return she’s treated as though she and her mother were never at the hotel. She’s left marooned on a strange island in a strange country. She’s penniless and frightened, not to mention terrified for her mother’s well-being. The residents of Coney Island are largely “Unusuals,” or the sideshow entertainers. It’s an eclectic bunch of strongmen, flea wranglers, lion tamers, and con men that Kitty encounters, but the Unusuals quickly embrace their suddenly impoverished foreign guest. Plagues make for strange bedfellows, after all, because that mysterious illness Kitty’s mother contracted? It’s spreading.

I must admit I was rather disappointed to discover that there was no actual reported outbreak of plague in Coney Island during this time period. I like my historical fiction best when the overarching situations are rooted in fact. I also adore a motley crew of misfits, so I was on board with the Unusuals and their fascinating little society. Unfortunately, I found the execution just a bit clunky. It got to a point where it seemed like every cool or quirky concept the author brainstormed while writing was thrown in for the sake of not wasting an idea rather than making sure it worked well in the narrative. In the end, I was left wanting more backstory for certain characters and fewer extraneous asides. Still, I think it’s a book worth reading- it’s certainly a fun and bizarre ride. If you’re in the mood for something different and dig the whole circus/sideshow thing, you should totally check out Magruder’s Curiosity Cabinet

Talk to me, Bookworms! Have any of y’all been to Coney Island? What’s it like? Is it one of those places that just seems to breathe with old timey creeptasticness?

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

Divider

May 04

Bookish (And Not So Bookish) Thoughts, May 4, 2016

Bookish (And Not So Bookish) Thoughts 14

May the 4th Be With You, Bookworms!

This post isn’t actually going to have anything to do with Star Wars, but I do so love that pun. I’m running behind on reviews, to the surprise of nobody, so I’m just going to recap some random things from this weekend, cool?

bookishnotsobookish

ONE: Hubs and I took a long weekend just for the heck of it. I mean, we’re grown ups and we always seem to have more vacation accrued than is necessary. So. We thought, “We should go to St. Louis and see the penguins at the zoo there and maybe go in the arch and probably eat Italian food.” Sounds like fun, right? Except. It rained so so so much both at home and in St. Louis that we decided we’d rather be warm and home than cold and in the rain with penguins. So we watched a lot of TV on Saturday, including Hubs’s first viewing of Fast Times at Ridgemont High.

TWO: After watching Fast Times at Ridgemont High and the glorious opening mall scene, we got a bit morose at the death of the shopping mall (our mall just lost its Macy’s and has been struggling to keep stores in it, and it’s a pattern we’ve seen in a number of Central Illinois malls.) So on Sunday, we decided to drive like 3 hours to the Woodfield Mall in the Chicago suburbs because it’s huge and full of stores. At least it was indoor entertainment.

THREE: While at the Woodfield Mall, we went into one of several hoity toity interior decorating places. I don’t know how one can be hoity toity AND inside a mall, but they managed it. Anyway, I picked up a bejeweled skull and was all “Oh Jim, LOOK! It’s Poor Yorick!” Because I never miss an opportunity to make a Shakespeare joke, plus, it was a bedazzled skull. Only a sales lady saw me with said skull and was all “Have you seen our other skull things? We have the best collection of skulls you’ll find anywhere!” And I didn’t want to embarrass her (or admit to my lame Hamlet joke) so I listened and was all “Oh wow. Skull things. Cool.”

malleverybody

FOUR: We decided to eat at Rainforest Cafe because I remember it being the coolest place EVER when I was a kid. (It doesn’t really hold up, but I digress.) Because we didn’t want to wait half an hour for a table, we told we could eat at the bar with no wait, AS LONG AS WE WERE BOTH 21. Haaaaaaaaaa! They even double carded us. We had to each show a driver’s license PLUS a credit or debit card (or anything else with our names on them.) It got me thinking. When I was in college and underage SOME PEOPLE (definitely not me…) had IDs that were not fake, they just weren’t ours. I mean theirs. Because this was not about me. Of course, this was in the era before everybody and their mom had debit and credit cards with them at all times (back in the day, many of us carried cash) BUT. We THEY would have been SO BUSTED had the whole double carding thing happened.

FIVE: Because we were on our little adventure to the mall, we were in danger of missing Game of Thrones so Hubs set it to record from his phone. He can do all the things from his phone. Open the garage door, set the thermostat, monitor his credit card purchases- it’s insane. So. We finally get home and hit play on our show. The previous episode’s recaps have Spanish subtitles. I look at Jim and I’m like “Dude, I think you recorded the Spanish version” and he’s all “well, whatever, if it’s just subtitles, NBD.” But then the theme music played and at the end, a booming voice announced “JUEGO DE TRONOS!” Aaaaaaaand the whole episode had, in fact, recorded overdubbed in Spanish. Because our HBO package is comprehensive enough to include all the things in more than one language. So we stayed up late and caught it in a re-run. In English this time.

The only “Bookish” thing about this entire post is a bad Shakespeare joke. High five, self. You are one super duper book blogger. Alright Bookworms, what did you do this weekend?

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

Divider

May 02

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

Coming of Age, Fantasy, Humor, Vampires, Young Adult Fiction 10

Hello Bookworms,

I’ve told you how much I love Rainbow Rowell before, right? In case you missed my reviews of Attachments, Eleanor & Park, Fangirl, and Landline, you can check them out here, here, here, and here. After devouring Landline much too quickly, I decided I’d wait on reading Rowell’s next release. Instead of begging the publisher for an advanced copy, I put myself on a seemingly endless library wait list so that by the time I read it, the wait for the next book wouldn’t seem as long. I probably won’t do that again because it kind of sucked, but I thought I should try it. The good news is that the library wait list eventually ended and I got to read Carry On!

carryonCarry On is the story of Simon Snow. Yes, THAT Simon Snow. The one Cath and Wren were totally enthralled with in Fangirl? Of course, it’s the fan fiction version of Simon Snow, not “canon” (which doesn’t actually exist. Wow. This is harder to explain than I thought it would be.) Okay, so. You don’t HAVE to have read Fangirl to enjoy Carry On because I think it can stand alone, but you should read both regardless because they’re delicious. Back to Simon. He’s a magician who attends a magical boarding school and he just wants to get through his final year without any of the life threatening shenanigans that have plagued his school career up to this point.

Unfortunately, his mentor wants him to hide out in the mountains, his roommate is missing, and his girlfriend just broke up with him. Ghosts are coming out of the woodwork, vampires are a thing, and don’t get me started on the super villain. Suffice it to say that our dear Simon probably isn’t going to get his wish for an uneventful school year.

I love Rainbow Rowell. This book was such a playful take on Harry Potter-esque stories, what with the punny spells and such. Plus, it’s a bit of a swoony love story. It’s not a spoiler for those who have read Fangirlbut it becomes apparent quite early on in Carry On that Simon and his roommate/potential vampire Baz have some serious sexual tension happening. Which means, yes, there are boys falling for other boys. Which is, in my opinion, pretty awesome. Even if the dudes in question are magicians/potential vampires, it’s nice to see some LGBT representation in YA literature.

Talk to me, Bookworms! If you were to write fan fiction, what would be your fandom of choice?

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

Divider

Apr 27

Bite Size Reviews April 2016

Bite Size Reviews 19

Howdy Bookworms!

Today I’m going to do a roundup of the books I’ve recently read that I’ve been a little too lazy to review individually. It’s a thing that happens sometimes, I trust you won’t mind terribly? I’m going to include a graphic of a cookie, so I’m assuming you’ll forgive me. It’s hard to stay mad at chocolate chip cookies, even if they are imaginary.

bitesizereviews

ONE. Shades of Grey by Jasper Fford: Hold your roll there, folks, I’m not talking about that soft core porn/ Twilight fan fiction (mostly because I already talked about it.) This is a different book. And what an enjoyable romp of a book it was! Jasper Fford’s unique brand of quirky humor and general weirdness thrills me to no end. I mean, remember The Eyre Affair?! (Review) In Shades of Grey, some unnamed tragedy destroyed society as we know it and the mysterious dystopian society that has replaced it is completely based on the levels of color blindness. It is weird and wonderful.

TWO. Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling: If you have the opportunity to experience this book via your earholes, I highly recommend the audio book. Mindy Kaling’s voice telling her own stories makes it that much more enjoyable. It’s a cute, fun book in which Kaling addresses some of her experiences in Hollywood. Her discussion of body image I found particularly interesting, because it’s complicated. And I totally get that. Also, apparently she and I wear the same size. Which means we should become best friends so I can raid her closet. Obviously.

THREE. Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson: Dead Wake is about the sinking of the Lusitania (obviously), which has long been considered a major catalyst for the US entering WWI. I like Erik Lason, I do. But he tends to get bogged down in details I don’t find super interesting. Like, the carrot of the Lusitania sinking is dangled before me and the U-Boat life is all grossly and wonderfully described, but that dang U-Boat sees and sinks or damages boat after boat after boat- none of which are the Lusitania. I’m not good at delayed gratification.

FOUR. The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri: I’ve been meaning to read Jhumpa Lahiri for a long time, but you know what finally got me to pick of one of her books? I read that she’s Mindy Kaling’s favorite author. I don’t typically base my reading choices on celebrity endorsements, but since Mindy Kaling and I are sharing clothes now, she’s more of a trusted friend than a celebrity. This book was SO GOOD and the only reason that it’s being lumped into a tiny review is because I don’t feel smart enough to discuss it with the nuance it deserves. Here’s a snippet of the synopsis from Goodreads: “Two brothers bound by tragedy; a fiercely brilliant woman haunted by her past; a country torn by revolution. A powerful new novel–set in both India and America–that explores the price of idealism and a love that can last long past death.” So yeah. You can see why I can’t review this properly, right?!

Whew! What a whirlwind! And what a variety. High five to me on for the complete randomness of reading choices. You can’t plan this kind of thing folks. To borrow a phrase from the brilliant Andi and Heather, this is FREE RANGE READING at its finest! What have you been reading, Bookworms?

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

Divider

Divider

Apr 22

Dietland by Sarai Walker

Contemporary Fiction, Women's Studies 17

Greetings Bookworms,

Wow. Am I ever behind on telling y’all about what I’m reading. 99 percent of the time when I’m running behind, it’s because I’m pretty lazy. This time, though, I really needed to sit on my thoughts for a while before I could put together a blog post. That’s mostly because reading Dietland by Sarai Walker felt so… Explosive.

dietlandPlum Kettle goes through life trying to keep a low profile. Her lifelong weight struggle has instilled a desperate desire to blend into the background, a feat she never quite accomplishes. Plum works from home or a local cafe answering the fan mail and advice requests for a popular teen girl’s magazine. After years of failed diets, Plum has decided to undergo weight loss surgery.

She’s confident in her decision until she acquires something of a stalker in a college age girl wearing brightly colored tights and combat boots. When Plum tries to investigate the odd girl that’s been following her, she falls into a collective of women living life outside of society’s terms. All this comes about around the same time as a vigilante group known as “Jennifer” begins dangerous attacks on a world that’s hostile toward women.

Dietland takes a no holds barred approach to eviscerating the beauty industry, gender inequality, rape culture, society’s obsession with weight loss, and the general nastiness that surrounds being overweight.

You guys, I have so many complicated feelings about this book. Every time I wanted to high five the author for making an incredible point, something happened that made me want to rescind my hand. I was all about the take down of diet culture. It sucks and this book disembowled it. High five right there. Of course, I wanted that high five right back when I read the way the author treated Plum’s antidepressant use. Are anti-depressants over-prescribed? Maybe. But are there a lot of people who NEED medication to manage their mental illnesses? Abso-freaking-lutely. Is this sort of characterization helpful? Nope. Not even a little. Then there’s the beauty industry. Does it feed on women’s insecurities? Totally. But the book slammed the beauty industry SO HARD that it made me feel like a crap feminist for enjoying wearing makeup and shaving my armpits. And as much as there’s a part of me that would love to see rapists and other horrible human beings punished when the criminal justice system fails, I just can’t with the vigilante stuff.

Are you starting to get a clearer picture of why I’m such a muddled mess over this book? The cognitive dissonance is STRONG with this one. Even though I didn’t agree with every little stance, I still think that Dietland starts all sorts of incredible and important conversations. It would make a stellar book club pick, especially if debates are your group’s jam.

Alright Bookworms. As you can see I’m a hot steaming pile of emotions here. What was the last book you read that left your feelings all a roiling?

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive small commission.*

 

Divider

Apr 20

Bookish (And Not So Bookish) Thoughts: April 20, 2016

Bookish (And Not So Bookish) Thoughts, Personal 13

Hidey Ho Bookworms!

Man, life has been getting away from me. I have read oodles and oodles of books that I have yet to tell you about. I’m simply having the worst time getting myself to write coherent thoughts. In the spirit of incoherence, though, it’s Wednesday. Time for Bookish (And Not So Bookish) Thoughts! (Thanks to Christine at Bookishly Boisterous for my new favorite game.)

bookishnotsobookish

ONE: I returned from Cincinnati on Sunday, and though I’m happy to be back home with the Hubs, every time I part company with my bestie, I’m transported back to being 14 years old at an airport saying goodbye to the BFF who moved from Illinois to Maryland. I mean, we generally devolve into our pubescent selves immediately upon meeting anyway, what with the giggling, Dave Coulier jokes, and spontaneous Fountains of Wayne singalongs, so I tend to get a little misty when saying goodbye. And now that there are adorable little kids I have to say goodbye to as well? Suffice it to say I left a little piece of my heart in Ohio.

TWO:  I have several pieces of furniture containing collectibles and odds and ends in my house, not to mention a statue of a penguin butler (Alfred rules.) You might think that I had one of the more whimsical living spaces of my friends as a result of these things, but you know what I don’t have? A gold gryphon mask perched atop a dress form wearing an Elizabethan doublet and ruff. That’s right. My pal has a degree in costume design and Godric (I named him) is simply the compilation of a couple of her school projects on display. He was hanging out in the guest room, so she obligingly hid him behind some furniture along with another scary mask so I wouldn’t wake up in the middle of the night terrified. Her kids will always have the most amazing Halloween costumes. If she can get Junie to wear something other than a tutu, that is.

IMG_1050

THREE: Hanging out with my nieces and nephews is my favorite. Being Crazy Aunt Katie is so much fun, I can’t even tell you. And I’m not just talking about all the awesome kid lit I get to buy (though that is a major perk. Do you know how many picture books there are about penguins? I mean, it wouldn’t be weird for me to buy doubles of them just to keep for my own purposes, would it?) I am also talking about the fact that when I went to pick Jack up from school on Friday, one of his little 2nd grade friends asked who I was, then said “Wow, she looks really young.” I’m sure it didn’t hurt that I was wearing a t-shirt bearing the Disney version of the Cheshire Cat (complete with sparkles) but I’m going to accept the compliment at face value and embrace my (apparently) youthful countenance. Thanks, random 2nd grader!

IMG_1078

Yeah yeah I know it’s out of focus. You try to get a steady selfie with an 8 year old and 2 year old!

FOUR: I’m going to BEA in Chicago this year. For those not in the know, it’s Book Expo America, a giant trade show for the book and publishing industry. Because APPARENTLY I qualify as an industry professional. Sort of. Anyway, I’m very excited, but I’m also super nervous. There will be plenty of bloggers there that I “know” but I’ve met none of them in person. When I went to BlogHer, I attended with Chrissy (fellow blogger, college roommate, and easily one of the most important people in my world) so she HAD to hang out with me even though there were cooler people around. I have no built in safety person and I’m currently the queen of anxiety. I don’t feel cool enough or in-the-know enough or smart enough or anything. But I also know that if I don’t go when BEA is in my proverbial backyard, I’ll never go and that I’ll always regret it. Soooooo. I’m going. I’m also sleeping on my SIL’s couch which means I’ll get to snuggle niece in the evenings post conference. Emma thinks I’m cool. Just because she’s still in diapers doesn’t mean she doesn’t have good taste, right?

FIVE: READATHON is THIS WEEKEND!!! Have you signed up yet?

I think that’ll do it for today. I’ve got other things rattling around in my noggin, but I’m going to attempt to channel them into some book review posts. Yeah, I don’t really think it’s going to happen either, but a girl can dream. What are you up to, Bookworms?

Divider

Apr 13

Bookish (And Not So Bookish) Thoughts: April 13, 2016

Bookish (And Not So Bookish) Thoughts 13

Happy Wednesday, Bookworms!

It’s fast becoming my favorite day of the week thanks to the nonsensical roundup that is Bookish (And Not So Bookish) Thoughts hosted by Bookishly Boisterous. These are the most fun posts for me to write, I hope you guys enjoy them too!

bookishnotsobookish

ONE: I’m leaving for Cincinnati tomorrow! I don’t normally tell y’all before I embark on a trip because it’s supposedly a rather unsafe thing to do, letting people know your home will be unattended. But. My home will not be unattended. Hubs will be home because I’m doing my annual girl’s weekend with the Bestie and spoiling my “niece” and “nephew.” I’m pretty stoked. I’ve got an audio book and Hamilton to keep me company, so that 5 hour drive? Piece of cake.

TWO: I’ve been helping the amazing Andi of Estella’s Revenge and Heather of Capricious Reader prepare cheerleading teams for Dewey’s 24 Hour Readathon. Those two deserve medals because organizing this event is a labor of love. Emphasis on labor. I named all the teams after birds just so I could captain Team Penguin. Put a (flightless) bird on it.

THREE: Every once in a great while I’ll get a hateful blog comment from a random internet person telling me that I don’t get the “beautiful love story” that is Lolita (gag) or that The Color Purple is evidence Alice Walker’s sick mind (bite me.) Rather than allowing the comments to post, I usually just delete them because I don’t have the energy or desire to fight with banana heads online. It’s kind of weird, you’d think that sort of thing would upset me, but I only really get upset when someone says something mean and they actually have a point. (Sometimes I am an idiot, I’ll own it.) That is probably part of the reason I’m afraid to open my big mouth about Dietland. I’m pretty sure I’ll eff it up somehow.

FOUR: My library hold for Carry On by Rainbow Rowell finally came up and I’m loving it. As if there were any doubt, really. I’m trying walk a fine line between savoring the book and finishing before it’s unceremoniously yanked from my Kindle. I say that like it’s a terrible thing, but I actually LOOOOOOVE that I can get library books on my Kindle and that I never get overdue fees.

FIVE: The friend I’m visiting is expecting a baby (#3!) and probably isn’t going to find out the sex before delivery. Which is fine. But have you ever tried to find a gender neutral baby gift? I couldn’t even find a nice yellow ducky sleeper, for heaven’s sake. Guess what, NewBabe? You’re getting books! Get used to it!

So, Bookworms, since today is my Friday, what are your plans for the weekend? 

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission.*

Divider

Apr 11

Emma Thompson Reads Me Ghost Stories: The Turn of the Screw

Audio Books, Classics 15

Greetings Bookworms!

How often do you get to say that a celebrity read you a bedtime story? You’d be able to say that a lot more often if you were down with audio books, believe you me. Of course, if you’d rather stay up all night being confused and creeped out than actually sleep, I’ve got the bedtime story for you. Or Emma Thompson does. Audible hooked up with Emma Thompson to produce an audio version of The Turn of the Screw by Henry James, which is only the quintessential gothic ghost story. *Please note that I did not actually listen to this before bed because nightmares. I only listened in broad daylight.*

turnofthescrewI decided to give the book a listen because I love Emma Thompson and The Turn of the Screw has been on my TBR list since the beginning of time. The narrator of an audio book can have a profound effect on the awesomeness of the experience, which is why it was smart-smart-smart of the powers that be to tap an Oscar winning actress to tackle Henry James. The Turn of the Screw isn’t long and it doesn’t do the blood and guts thing, so it relies heavily on atmosphere, foreboding, and playing into the reader’s fear of potentially evil children (which is a fear instilled into this reader by a few babysitting jobs… And Children of the Corn.) Emma Thompson’s narration hit all the right creepy notes, and she did a good enough job of differentiating between the different characters’ voices that I was never in doubt as to who was talking. A neat trick considering the characters consisted of a governess, a heavily accented housekeeper, and two small children.

We’ve discussed before on this blog that I’ve got a serious weakness for audio books. We’ve also discussed some of the channels by which I access my audio books. Audible has long been one of my favorites. You can buy books without a subscription if you want, but at $14.95 a month, the subscription offers big savings, particularly if you’re into giant chunksters. One of Diana Gabaldon’s novels could run you nearly $50 if you were to buy a la carte (still not a bad deal if you’re considering the 55 hours of listening enjoyment AND the endless Jamie Fraser daydreams), but if you had a subscription? Giant savings. Another one of the things I love about Audible? Even if you suspend your subscription for any reason, you get to KEEP all those books you bought at a ridiculous savings and listen to them whenever you want. If there are series you want to revisit again and again? I highly recommend you purchase them through Audible. I personally have the entire Outlander and Harry Potter series hanging out in my library.

Still unsure if you want to try out Audible? They’ll give you a one month subscription for FREE. That’s right. You could listen to Emma Thompson read you The Turn of the Screw (or any other book you fancy) for zero dollars. Give it a whirl! You’ve got nothing to lose. Well. Except maybe sleep. Curse you, Henry James!

*This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Audible. The opinions and text are all mine.*

Divider

Apr 07

Lies and Other Acts of Love by Kristy Woodson Harvey

Contemporary Fiction 3

Greetings Bookworms!

I am on an absolute roll with the water works this week, you guys. I cried while watching Inside Out (expected) AND Trainwreck (unexpected). Then I cried during two different books. Not that I don’t cry a lot, because I am totally a crier, but it’s a little unusual to have so many instances of non-real-life crying in a single week. My subconscious is probably just super pissed that it’s April and it’s still pretending to be winter and icky outside. I have a point, I promise. The second book to make me cry this week was Lies and Other Acts of Love by Kristy Woodson Harvey. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from the author for review consideration. She seems super nice, but I’ll still give you an honest opinion. I’ve known you longer. And, you know, integrity, blah blah blah.*

LiesandOtherActsofLoveLynn “Lovey” White has seen a thing or twelve during her sixty years of marriage. You can’t be married that long and raise a family of five daughters without appreciating the art of the little white lie. Life hasn’t been perfect, but she’s made it work. At this point, she’d just like to see her family happy and settled. Unfortunately, her granddaughter Annabelle has been living in a whirlwind. After dumping her hedge fund manager fiance, Annabelle rebounded FAST with a musician she met and married within the week. When Annabelle’s life begins to spiral out of control, she comes to understand that things aren’t always what they seem and that difficult choices are part of this whole life gig.

Lies and Other Acts of Love was a bit of a complicated read for me. I simply adored Lovey and Dan’s story- in fact, I’d read an entire book about their life together with no complaint. The overarching themes of love being complicated and the idea that there’s often more to a fairy tale love story than meets the eye? Totally resonated with me. Great stuff.

But then there was Annabelle. You know how sometimes when you’re reading a book you want to jump into the pages and give a character a good shake? That’s how I felt about Annabelle. I don’t fault the author for this, my frustration with the character was 100% about my own personal hangups. That’s part of the fun of reading, though. Different books affect people in different ways. Annabelle drove me bonkers. She just kept making terrible choices. The fact that a single character was able to get under my skin so much is a testament to the author’s skill, though, don’t you think? I mean, most of the characters I’ve most wanted to give a stern “talking to” are out of classic novels, so if that’s any indication of quality, this was quite well done. Bottom line? If you like Southern fiction and aren’t completely jaded by the concept of love at first sight, Lies and Other Acts of Love could absolutely be a winner for you.

Soooo Bookworms, let’s talk. Tell me about some of the fictional characters that drove you bananas. Please? 

*If you make a purchase through a link on this site, I will receive a small commission. The author will also receive a commission. I think. I don’t actually know how it works with book sales. Kristy Woodson Harvey really does seem exceptionally nice, though, just in case you’re on the fence about the purchase. You probably won’t want to punch Annabelle. Clearly that’s on me.*

Divider